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Drupal 8.5.0 is now available

Wed, 03/07/2018 - 16:51
What's new in Drupal 8.5.0?

This new version makes Media module available for all, improves migrations significantly, stabilizes the Content Moderation and Settings Tray modules, serves dynamic pages faster with BigPipe enabled by default, and introduces a new experimental entity layout user interface. The release includes several very important fixes for workflows of content translations and supports running on PHP 7.2.

Download Drupal 8.5.0

Media in core improved and available to all site builders

In Drupal 8.4, we added a Media API to core that drew on work from the contributed Media Entity module, but the module was hidden from the user interface due to user experience issues. In Drupal 8.5, many of the usability issues have been addressed, and the module now can be enabled normally. Media in Drupal 8.5 supports uploading and playing audio and video files, as well as listing and reusing media.

For an optimal user experience, we suggest enhancing the core feature set with the rich ecosystem of contributed modules that extends the core Media module. In future releases, we will improve the core user experience with a media library and other tools, add WYSIWYG integration, add support for remote media types like YouTube videos, and provide an upgrade path for existing basic File and Image field data on existing sites.

Settings Tray and Content Moderation now stable

Two experimental modules originally added with Drupal 8.2.0 have been steadily improving in past releases and are now stable. The Settings Tray module provides a quick solution to manage settings in context, such as moving items around in a menu block. The Content Moderation module allows defining content workflow states such as Draft, Archived, and Published, as well as which roles have the ability to move content between states. Drupal 8.5.0 also adds support for translations to be moderated independently.

New experimental Layout Builder module

The new experimental Layout Builder module provides display layout capabilities for articles, pages, user profiles, and other entity displays. Layout Builder uses the same "outside-in" user interface that Settings Tray module does, allowing site builders to edit their layouts on the actual page (rather than having to go to a separate form on the backend). The current user interface is a basic implementation but we expect it will improve significantly in the coming months.

Big steps for migrations

After over four years of work, this release marks the Migrate system's architecture stable. The Drupal Migrate and Drupal Migrate UI modules are also considered stable for upgrading monolingual sites. (Multilingual site upgrades are still not fully supported.) Support for incremental migrations is also included in this release. See the migrate announcement for further details on migrating to Drupal 8.

BigPipe by default

The BigPipe module provides an advanced implementation of Facebook's BigPipe page rendering strategy for greatly improved perceived performance for pages with dynamic, personalized, or uncacheable content. The module was added in Drupal 8.1.0 experimentally and became stable in Drupal 8.3.0. Following real-world testing, Big Pipe is now included as part of Drupal 8.5.0's Standard installation profile, so that all Drupal 8 sites will be faster by default. BigPipe is also the first new Drupal 8 feature to mature from an experimental prototype all the way to being part of a standard installation!

Groundwork for a Drupal 8 "Out of the Box" demo

Drupal 8.5.0 includes the groundwork for a new demo profile and theme from the Out of the Box Initiative, which will be a beautiful, modern demonstration of Drupal's capabilities. This will allow us to provide the demo experimentally, possibly in a future Drupal 8.5 release. (The demo profile and theme should not be used on actual production or development sites since no backwards compatibility or upgrade paths are provided.) If you'd like to see this demo in action, you can also see it in the 8.6.x development version.

PHP 7.2 now supported

Drupal 8.5.0 now runs on PHP 7.2, which comes with new features and improves performance over PHP 7.1. PHP 7.2 is now the recommended PHP version to use with Drupal 8.

What does this mean for me? Drupal 8 site owners

Update to 8.5.0 to continue receiving bug and security fixes. The next bugfix release (8.5.1) is scheduled for April 4, 2018.

Updating your site from 8.4.5 to 8.5.0 with update.php is exactly the same as updating from 8.4.4 to 8.4.5. Drupal 8.5.0 also has updates to several dependencies, including a backwards-compatible update to a Symfony long-term-support release (which will be supported for many years). Modules, themes, and translations may need updates for these and other changes in this minor release, so test the update carefully before updating your production site.

Note that Drupal 8 will require PHP 7 starting in March 2019, one year from now. If your site is hosted on PHP 5.5 or 5.6, you should begin planning to upgrade (and consider upgrading to PHP 7.2 now that it is supported). See the Drupal core announcement about the PHP 5 end-of-life for more information.

Drupal 6 and 7 site owners

Drupal 7 is still fully supported and will continue to receive bug and security fixes throughout all minor releases of Drupal 8. Drupal 6 is no longer supported. See the migrate announcement for further details on migrating to Drupal 8.

Translation, module, and theme contributors

Minor releases like Drupal 8.5.0 include backwards-compatible API additions for developers as well as new features. Read the 8.5.0 release notes for more details on the improvements for developers in this release.

Since minor releases are backwards-compatible, modules, themes, and translations that supported Drupal 8.4.x and earlier will be compatible with 8.5.x as well. However, the new version does include some changes to strings, user interfaces, internal APIs and API deprecations. This means that some small updates may be required for your translations, modules, and themes. See the announcement of the 8.5.0 release candidate for more background information.

Categories: Drupal

Big steps for migrations in Drupal 8.5.0

Wed, 03/07/2018 - 16:51

After over four years of work with over 570 contributors and 1300+ closed issues, Drupal 8.5.0 releases the Migrate system's architecture as fully stable. This means that developers can write migration paths without worrying for stability of the underlying system.

On top of that the Migrate Drupal and Migrate Drupal UI modules (providing Drupal 6 and 7 to Drupal 8 migrations) are considered stable for upgrading monolingual sites. All of the remaining critical issues for the Migrate Drupal module's upgrade paths and stability are related to multilingual migration support (so multilingual site upgrades are still not fully supported).

Support for incremental migrations is now also available, which means that site owners can work gradually on their new Drupal 8 site while content is still being added to the old site. When migrations (including incremental migrations) are run through the user interface, site owners will now see a warning if some data on the Drupal 8 site might be overwritten. (A similar fix for Drush is not yet available, so be careful not to overwrite data if you run a migration on the command line.) 

Upgrade instructions for Drupal 6 and Drupal 7 sites can be found in the Upgrading to Drupal 8 handbook. Your old site can still remain up and running while you test migrating your data into your new Drupal 8 site. If you happen to find a bug, that is not a known migrate issue, your detailed bug report with steps to reproduce is a big help!

Unlike previous versions, Drupal 8 stores translated content as single entities. Multilingual sites with reference fields (node_reference, entity_reference) or multilingual menus can upgrade to Drupal 8 using Drush, executing the desired migrations one by one. In this process you need to create and run a series of additional custom migrations to reflect the new entity identifiers assigned during earlier migrations. There is no automation implemented for this process yet.

Data can be migrated to Drupal 8 also from non-Drupal sources such as CSV, XML, JSON, or directly from 3rd party systems' databases. For instructions and examples, refer to Migrate API handbook.

Huge thanks again to all the contributors who made this possible.

Categories: Drupal

Remembering J-P Stacey

Mon, 02/26/2018 - 00:35

In 2017 we saw the passing of J-P, community friend, mentor, leader, and contributor. Within the community J-P's was known for his passions: Drupal, programming culture, gardening, cycling and the environment. We invited people to share their memories of J-P and his impact; we share them with you now in memoriam. This is a moving tribute and a celebration of his life.

We invite you to also share your tributes in the comments section.

J-P Stacey on the Tour de Drupal 2016 Photo by Christian Ziegler
The person

J-P was a bright intelligent, quirky chap, ADORED animals, he would melt at the mention of our pets names, he would happily spend hours cooing over stories of his beloved cat Indie, he'd oblige you in hours and hours of stories about your beloved animals - kae76

Whenever I was with JP he was always smiling. He was always there to help and it was always a pleasure to see JP at Drupal events and chat to him on IRC - aburrows

Nice. My overriding memory of J-P is how nice he was. When he moved up to Sheffield and started attending the Yorkshire meetups he fitted right in straight away. He always found time to ask how people were doing and genuinely cared what they were saying. He was always patient, positive and happy to help others - kmbremner

I remember first meeting J-P at DrupalCamp Oxford in 2012, when I had just started out running a small business and I remember thinking how much of a mad professor he looked, and discussing different parts of Oxford with him. The last time I saw J-P was sharing a meal with at DrupalCamp London 2017 near Euston. Both times J-P was actively seeking to engage people from the edges of the community (all the other Drupalists at the meal were freelancers or small businesses) and I know that was something he was highly instrumental at working with. I actually went back to that restaurant recently, and it seems slightly strange that I won't see J-P at another event - willhallonline

J-P being present just simply makes you happy, such an open genuine chap. Always disappointment around if he can't attend a catch-up, and anticipation if you know he will be there. J-P, always the gentleman, honoured my poor jokes with a titter or a laugh, even if it first met with an understandable groan - waako

I knew J-P, in that we participated together every year as mentors at the Friday Core Sprints at Drupalcon. Last year at Drupalcon Dublin, I asked J-P to be my "mentor mentor" because I was so impressed by his gentle and unruffled style. He organized the team at his table with exemplary grace and good humour. I was particularly struck by how quickly he gathered a group of enthusiastic people around him. Bye J-P, it was a true honour to have known you, if only once a year, in this particular context - michaellenahan

He was *always* cheerful! - greg.harvey

JP always took the time to talk to people and explain things to people who needed help. It's safe to say that helping people was a passion for JP - Ikit-claw

I recall the Friday evening of Drupalcamp London 2017, J-P and I met at Old Street Station and travelled to Kings Cross to meet up with fellow Drupalists for a meal at the Diwana Bhel Poori house for a meal. The trip and the hour long wait there for the rest to join us was filled with fun and interesting conversation. We realised how much we had in common and made each other laugh. That plus stimulating conversation over great food I will remember for a long while - TechnoTim2010

The thing I will always remember best about J-P his determination to stick to his principles; be they in code, in process, in environmental matters or even his house and garden! It was so sweet on occasion to see him struggle when pragmatism meant they couldn’t always be followed but it constantly reminded me to try harder myself. I miss J-P but I know I’ll be a better person for knowing him and looking up to him - rachel_norfolk

I met him via tour de drupal Amsterdam and Barcelona. J-P was cycling a long way alone, Criz and I would cycle the Pyrenees for 2 days and then we met for the final leg to Barcelona and had a really good time. I didn't get to know Stacey too much but felt he was a very calm, positive, free person - dasjo

Working on a project with J-P with him as lead developer and me acting as project manager, what I loved was the fact he would always push back on every story, but as we chatted about options, he'd end up getting excited and committing to even more than I expected to get in the first place - stevecowie

J-P was a brilliant companion on various Tour de Drupal cycle rides from the UK to wherever Drupalcon was being held. His great sense of humour, adventure and unflappable flexibility made him an excellent person to cycle with, and he was great at drawing people in, involving them and making everyone feel at ease. These same characteristics made him great fun to be around at a conference; I remember the "I'll do it if you will" approach that got us into talking at a Drupal unconference, with just a few minutes' notice in his case. He cared about others, and his strong sense of fairness and inclusion as well as pragmatism were of great value when there were difficult decisions to be made - martin_q

JP was involved with the modern web development apprentices (a.k.a. Drupal apprentices) programme in the UK. The last time I met JP was shortly before his holiday trip to Spain. We were scoping out some training days for the apprentices programme, as budget had become available to run 1-day topic-focussed trainings with external specialists. He was looking forward to training apprentices on test-driven development after his holiday - andrewmacpherson

#drupal #sprintweekend Sheffield 2016 Shared on twitter by @rivimey
The Drupaller & mentor

I was aware how deeply knowledgeable he was, and his ability to make that knowledge accessible to others, and his nature to always hear others out, always assuming he hadn't got the answer. He wasn't shy to press someone about a topic which he believed was being overlooked, or underrepresented - kae76

He was excellent at explaining and helping others - aburrows

I remember J-P presenting about Drush Make at DrupalCamp North West 2013. It really opened my eyes to how there was a more efficient way of doing things than I had known before. Years later he was a strong advocate for Composer evangelising the benefits to the local community and beyond - kmbremner

The thing I will remember most about J-P was his passion around open-source software. He was committed to Drupal and passionate about the community. It always seemed that he really cared about the *little* guy. The person starting up, or the newcomer to the community - willhallonline

He was always interested in problem solving, beyond that he was interested in understanding the problem, not solving it for you. He could explain code, like super-intelligent physics jokes, in the most clear manner and help you find direction. He would ask all the right questions about what you needed to achieve - waako

He totally "got" contrib, always looking for the pragmatic solution, always looking to use and/or improve existing code - greg.harvey

JP would take the time to help people learn code and point them in the right direction you could take to him on slack or irc and he would take the time to help you - Ikit-claw

J-P was always willing, if he had time, to help with any coding issues on IRC. He was busy much of the time. I would loved to have collaborated on a project with him, sadly never to be - TechnoTim2010

I’ve learned so much from J-P’s blog posts and always enjoyed our encounters at various events over the years. Highly technically competent and willing to spend time to share skills and knowledge, I saw J-P as part of the very fabric of what makes Drupal Drupal, the reason why I’ve hung around for so long - Steve Purkiss

Time. It didn’t matter how long it took for J-P to work with someone until they understood something - he’d see it through - rachel_norfolk

J-P was the alternative to Drupal stack exchange - stevecowie

JP shared his own learning very freely. After D8 came out JP set about learning the new API - he published what he learned on his blog, and those are some of the best D8 tutorials I've seen. "Did JP figure this out yet?" was often my first question, before approaching the official docs - andrewmacpherson

The future: what would J-P would want us to remember?

J-P would want us to remember the people behind the code; to spend the time helping new members of the community and making them feel welcome. To have a beer and get to know each other on a personal level - kmbremner

Documentation! Joking aside ... I honestly not sure how to answer this, fundamentally the J-P we all knew - cared about a lot of things, the environment, equal rights, good clean code, great clear documentation, meaningful social interactions and impact. But my everlasting memory is how much he held his family and friends in focussed concern - listening and hearing - sharing daft jokes and I personally honor him for his vulnerability he was an open book. This is the lesson I will learn and keep learning from J-P; listening and HEARING the ones you love, open honest vulnerability and there is never a bad time for a cat pun - kae76

Be kind to each other and get involved in the Drupal eco-system - aburrows

I think that the enduring message is that it is not about code. Code is far more ephemeral than community. People's enduring care for the Drupal community is what makes it powerful. And I feel that J-P knew that - willhallonline

He would want us to grow things, to experiment, cycle and to listen & engage with each other - waako

The planet - greg.harvey

I think he would want us to pay forward all the kind gestures he had done for others. If JP ever took the time to help you and see someone stuck who you could help I think he would want people to take 30 minutes to help someone else and encourage them - Ikit-claw

J-P was passionate about Drupal and would want us to share that passion, and help our fellow Drupalists. He was also passionate about Green issues and protecting and improving the environment, I am sure he would be happy I created a Drupal 8 site to support a campaign not to concrete over beautiful countryside, but instead push cycling and other non-destructive solutions -

We should consider our own green credentials and do anything we can for our local environment - TechnoTim2010

Learn, then teach - Steve Purkiss

His garden - rachel_norfolk

Go by your own pace - dasjo

From left to right: Christian, Youri, J-P, Stephen, Martin (Photo by Conor Cahill)
Reflections on Tour de Drupal 2016 Shared by MegaChriz - An evening in Belfast

On a cold Friday evening in Belfast - late September 2016 - J-P, Martin and Stephen arranged to meet me and Christian at a small restaurant in town. The streets were empty - as if everybody was either out of town or at home. But the restaurant was full till the brim - there was no more room inside. J-P, Martin and Stephen were sitting outside on the terrace of the restaurant when I and Christian arrived, having a drink and presumably trying to ignore the cold. Despite the cold, we had to wait for a table to become free inside before we could order some food (outside the ordered food would become cold in minutes, maybe even in seconds). So we sat there for about an hour and still no one came out to make room for us.

J-P had a hard time fighting his hunger and finally said "Maybe I should just go inside and stare at people to make them want to go away". J-P spread his eyes wide-open, pretend to be staring at us. That was one of the funniest moments I had with J-P.

J-P didn't go inside to stare people away, after some more time waiting there finally came room for us and together with Martin and Stephen, J-P ordered a 22 inch pizza. 

Tour de Drupal 2016

The next two days we cycled together from Belfast to Dublin. It was a great ride with mostly flat land and sometimes lots of rain! There were also some hills and J-P had a hard time cycling these on his Brompton. 

We hadn't arranged a overnight stay between the first and second cycle day, so on the first day J-P and Stephen had to make calls to several guest houses, bed and breakfasts, airbnb's, etc. to find a place for us to sleep. "Next time, I'll book an overnight beforehand," J-P said, "This was way too stressful."

The second day was more windy and because we seemed to be running out of time to get to Dublin the same day we took a shortcut. This was alongside a road where traffic was allowed to reach speeds of 100 km/hour. This was the part of the tour I didn't like much. One time I got blown to the berm, nearly falling off my bike! With time still running out I only got to Skerries as couldn't reach a higher speed (I took the rest by train). Despite that, I'm glad I have been able to cycle with this group.

It was our Tour de Drupal!

The Five Bikers Staring to the Sea. From left to right: Youri, Christian, Stephen, J-P, Martin. (Photo by Martin Quested)
AttachmentSize JP_bike_web_use.jpg84.89 KB
Categories: Drupal

Drupal 8.5.0-rc1 is available for testing

Thu, 02/22/2018 - 13:28

The first release candidate for the upcoming Drupal 8.5.0 release is now available for testing. Drupal 8.5.0 is expected to be released March 7.

Download Drupal-8.5.0-rc1

8.5.x makes the Media module available for all, improves migrations significantly, stabilizes the Content Moderation and Settings Tray modules, serves dynamic pages faster with BigPipe enabled by default, and introduces the new experimental Layout Builder module. The release includes several very important fixes for workflows of content translations and supports PHP 7.2. Finally, 8.5.0-rc1 also includes the same security updates that are provided in 8.4.5.

What does this mean to me? For Drupal 8 site owners

Drupal 8.4.5, a security update and the final release of the 8.4.x series, has also been released this week. 8.4.x sites should update immediately to 8.4.5, but going forward, 8.4.x will receive no further releases following 8.5.0's release date, and sites should prepare to update from 8.4.x to 8.5.x in order to continue getting bug and security fixes. Use update.php to update your 8.4.x sites to the 8.5.x series, just as you would to update from (e.g.) 8.4.2 to 8.4.3. You can use this release candidate to test the update. (Always back up your data before updating sites, and do not test updates in production.)

If you're an early tester who is already running 8.5.0-alpha1 or 8.5.0-beta1, you should update to 8.5.0-rc1 immediately. 8.5.0-rc1 includes security fixes (the same fixes that were released in Drupal 8.4.5).

Site owners should also take note of the fact that Drupal 8's support for PHP 5 will end in one year, in March 2019. PHP 7.2 is now the best recommended PHP version to use with Drupal 8.

For module and theme authors

Drupal 8.5.x is backwards-compatible with 8.4.x. However, it does include internal API changes and API changes to experimental modules, so some minor updates may be required. Review the change records for 8.5.x, and test modules and themes with the release candidate now.

For translators

Some text changes were made since Drupal 8.4.0. Localize.drupal.org automatically offers these new and modified strings for translation. Strings are frozen with the release candidate, so translators can now update translations.

For core developers

All outstanding issues filed against 8.4.x were automatically migrated to 8.5.x. Future bug reports should be targeted against the 8.5.x branch. 8.6.x will remain open for new development during the 8.5.x release candidate phase. The 8.5.x branch will be subject to release candidate restrictions, with only critical fixes and certain other limited changes allowed.

Your bug reports help make Drupal better!

Release candidates are a chance to identify bugs for the upcoming release, so help us by searching the issue queue for any bugs you find, and filing a new issue if your bug has not been reported yet.

Categories: Drupal

Drupal core - Critical - Multiple Vulnerabilities - SA-CORE-2018-001

Wed, 02/21/2018 - 12:10
Project: Drupal coreVersion: 8.4.x-dev7.x-devDate: 2018-February-21Security risk: Critical 16∕25 AC:Basic/A:User/CI:Some/II:Some/E:Exploit/TD:DefaultVulnerability: Multiple Vulnerabilities Description:  Comment reply form allows access to restricted content - Critical - Drupal 8

Users with permission to post comments are able to view content and comments they do not have access to, and are also able to add comments to this content.

This vulnerability is mitigated by the fact that the comment system must be enabled and the attacker must have permission to post comments.

JavaScript cross-site scripting prevention is incomplete - Critical - Drupal 7 and Drupal 8

Drupal has a Drupal.checkPlain() JavaScript function which is used to escape potentially dangerous text before outputting it to HTML. This function does not correctly handle all methods of injecting malicious HTML, leading to a cross-site scripting vulnerability under certain circumstances.

The PHP functions which Drupal provides for HTML escaping are not affected.

Private file access bypass - Moderately Critical - Drupal 7

When using Drupal's private file system, Drupal will check to make sure a user has access to a file before allowing the user to view or download it. This check fails under certain conditions in which one module is trying to grant access to the file and another is trying to deny it, leading to an access bypass vulnerability.

This vulnerability is mitigated by the fact that it only occurs for unusual site configurations.

jQuery vulnerability with untrusted domains - Moderately Critical - Drupal 7

A jQuery cross site scripting vulnerability is present when making Ajax requests to untrusted domains. This vulnerability is mitigated by the fact that it requires contributed or custom modules in order to exploit.

For Drupal 8, this vulnerability was already fixed in Drupal 8.4.0 as a side effect of upgrading Drupal core to use a newer version of jQuery. For Drupal 7, it is fixed in the current release (Drupal 7.57) for jQuery 1.4.4 (the version that ships with Drupal 7 core) as well as for other newer versions of jQuery that might be used on the site, for example using the jQuery Update module.

Language fallback can be incorrect on multilingual sites with node access restrictions - Moderately Critical - Drupal 8

When using node access controls with a multilingual site, Drupal marks the untranslated version of a node as the default fallback for access queries. This fallback is used for languages that do not yet have a translated version of the created node. This can result in an access bypass vulnerability.

This issue is mitigated by the fact that it only applies to sites that a) use the Content Translation module; and b) use a node access module such as Domain Access which implement hook_node_records().

Note that the update will mark the node access tables as needing a rebuild, which will take a long time on sites with a large number of nodes.

Settings Tray access bypass - Moderately Critical - Drupal 8

The Settings Tray module has a vulnerability that allows users to update certain data that they do not have the permissions for.

If you have implemented a Settings Tray form in contrib or a custom module, the correct access checks should be added. This release fixes the only two implementations in core, but does not harden against other such bypasses.

This vulnerability can be mitigated by disabling the Settings Tray module.

External link injection on 404 pages when linking to the current page - Less Critical - Drupal 7

Drupal core has an external link injection vulnerability when the language switcher block is used. A similar vulnerability exists in various custom and contributed modules. This vulnerability could allow an attacker to trick users into unwillingly navigating to an external site.


Install the latest version:

Reported By: 
  • Comment reply form allows access to restricted content - Critical - Drupal 8
  • JavaScript cross-site scripting prevention is incomplete - Critical - Drupal 7 and Drupal 8)
  • Private file access bypass - Moderately Critical - Drupal 7
  • jQuery vulnerability with untrusted domains - Moderately Critical - Drupal 7
  • Language fallback can be incorrect on multilingual sites with node access restrictions - Moderately Critical - Drupal 8
  • Settings Tray access bypass - Moderately Critical - Drupal 8
  • External link injection on 404 pages when linking to the current page - Less Critical - Drupal 7
Fixed By: 
Categories: Drupal

DrupalCamp London

Mon, 02/19/2018 - 14:45

The following blog was written by Drupal Association Premium Supporting Partner, DrupalCamp London.

The people surrounding Drupal have always been one of its strongest selling points; hence the motto “Come for the code, stay for the community”. We bring individuals from a multitude of backgrounds and skill sets together to push forward towards a common goal whilst supporting and helping each other. Within the community, there are a number of ways to connect to each other; both online and in person. A good way to meet in person is by attending DrupalCons and DrupalCamps.


A DrupalCamp can be similar to a DrupalCon but is on a much smaller scale. Where a ‘Con has 1,600+ attendees a ‘Camp ranges anywhere from 50-600 people. In Europe alone there were over 50 camps in 2017, including DrupalCamp London.

DrupalCamp London

DrupalCamp London brings together hundreds of people from across the globe who use, develop, design, and support the Drupal platform. It’s a chance for Drupalers from all backgrounds to meet, discuss, and engage in the Drupal community and project. DrupalCamp London is the biggest camp in Europe (followed very closely by Kiev), at ~600 people over three days. Due to its size and location, we’re able to run a wide range of sessions, keynotes, BoFs, Sprints, and activities to take part in.

What happens over the three days? Friday (CxO day)

Friday (CxO day) is primarily aimed at business leaders who provide or make use of Drupal services (i.e web development agencies, training companies, clients etc), but naturally, everyone is welcome. Throughout the day we'll have speakers talking about their experiences working with Drupal and Open Source technologies in their sector(s) or personal life. With a hot food buffet for lunch and a free drinks reception at the end of the day, you'll also have ample time to network with the other attendees.

Benefits of attending 

Benefits for CTOs, CMOs, COOs, CEOs, Technical Directors, Marketing Directors and Senior Decision Makers: 

  • Understand how leading organisations leverage the many benefits of Drupal
  • Network with similar organisations in your sector
  • Learn directly from thought leaders via specific case studies
Saturday/Sunday (Weekend event)

Over the weekend, we have 3 Keynote speakers, a choice of over 40 sessions to attend, BoF (Birds of a Feather) talks, Sprints, great lunch provided (both days) and a Saturday social. With all the activity there is something for everyone to get involved in.

Benefits of attending 


Over 500 people attended the weekend event last year and we are expecting it to grow even more this year. Not all attendees are devs either, with a fair share of managers, designers, C-Level, and UX leads there's a great opportunity for all skill sets to interact with each other. Big brands use Drupal (MTV, Visit England, Royal.gov, Guardian, Twitter, Disney) and this is a chance to meet with people from those companies to compare notes, and learn from each other. 


As above, the chance to meet so many people from various skill sets is a great way to line up potential interviews and hires for any aspect of your business. At the very least you'll be able to meet interesting people for any future potential hires. 

Marketing & Raising company profile 

Attending an event with a huge turnout is a great way to meet people and talk to them about what you and your company do. Embedding your name within the tight-knit Drupal community can attract the attention of other companies. Sponsoring the camp means that your logo and additional information can be seen around the camp, in tote bags given to attendees, and online. The social and sponsors stands are the perfect chance to talk to other companies and people attending DrupalCamp, to find out how they use Drupal for their benefit. 


DrupalCamp isn't just for Devs, over the weekend there are sessions on a broad range of topics including community & business, UX, and general site building/using Drupal. The technical topics aren’t just Drupal specific either, this gives developers (and others) the ability to learn more about general core coding concepts and methodologies. The methods and techniques learnt help with day to day development and long-term work. In addition to the planned sessions, BoF (birds of a feather) sessions, there are ad-hoc get-togethers where people can talk on any topic, allowing a free discussion to share ideas. 

Warm fuzzy feeling/giving back 

Drupal (like any open source software) wouldn't survive without the community. Camps and other events allow the members to come together and see ‘first hand’ that they’re giving back to a community that helps power their tech, maintains their interests, and enables them to make a living.

How to get involved?

It’s easy to get involved with DrupalCamp London, check us out on Twitter for updates and you can find out more about the event and buy tickets on our website.

Categories: Drupal