Information Technology

Learning how to write tree traversals and general questions about programming

Learn Programming - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 13:25

I was attempting leetcode's tree traversal problems and was able to figure out how to write some of them after lots of headache and inevitably looking up how other people did it.

But through all the hours spent trying to figure out these problems, I was wondering how some programmers build up a natural intuition on how to solve a problem and turn their solutions into working code. For example, I know the definition of preorder/postorder/inorder traversals, but until I saw people's algorithms and code the true logic between traversing a tree clicked with me.

As a novice, how do I build up this intuition? How can I go about becoming better at breaking problems to fundamental rules that I can then translate into working code? I know becoming a better developer takes years upon years of practice and effort, but I also feel like spending three days figuiring out traversals isn't the best use of my time either. The more efficient someone is at learning (less hours spent) obviously the better. What suggestions do you guys have in order to efficiently become better and figuring out situations like these?

submitted by /u/KingShindo
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SpamCannibal blacklist service reanimated by squatters, says everything's spam

The Register - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 13:20
Yes, even you

Defunct blacklisting service SpamCannibal was hijacked early on Wednesday morning, sowing email chaos in the process.…

[USA] Roughly $1500, laptop for programming & light gaming

  • Total budget and country of purchase: Roughly $1500, could go a bit higher. USA

  • Do you prefer a 2 in 1 form factor, good battery life or best specifications for the money? Pick or include any that apply. Both battery and a good CPU.

  • How important is weight and thinness to you? Not as important as battery life and performance.

  • Which OS do you require? Windows, Mac, Chrome OS, Linux. Windows, but I can install myself.

  • Do you have a preferred screen size? If indifferent, put N/A. 15.6 is nice, but it's of no specific importance.

  • Are you doing any CAD/video editing/photo editing/gaming? List which programs/games you desire to run. Potentially some light video editing via Premiere, but could offload that. Being able to compile fast would be neat as well. Most likely I'll want to play some games on it, ranging from Dead By Daylight to Guild Wars 2. Other than that, mostly CPU rather than GPU intensive games.

  • If you're gaming, do you have certain games you want to play? At what settings and FPS do you want? No specific games, but medium settings with 60 would be great.

  • Any specific requirements such as good keyboard, reliable build quality, touch-screen, finger-print reader, optical drive or good input devices (keyboard/touchpad)? A battery with 6+ hours of life would be good, I could potentially buy a replacement battery to switch out. Also, a CPU clocked around 3GHz (2.8 is fine) is my target. TurboBoost that clocks it up to there would be good as well.

  • Leave any finishing thoughts here that you may feel are necessary and beneficial to the discussion. I've looked around, and I've found the Eluktronics Pro-X P650HS-G + the Eluktronics MECH-15 and the Clevo N850EP6 to be very good, but lacking in battery life.

submitted by /u/Wakafanykai123
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How do I clean up a local repository mirror?

I subscribed our local ULN repo mirror to a OracleVM channel for a brief period, and now the volume is running low on space.

I've removed the subscription to that channel in ULN, but I cannot figure out how to have the local repository server go through and remove all packages associated with that channel.

Is that possible?

submitted by /u/GildMyKarma
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Process takes CO₂ from the air, converts it to carbon nanotubes

Ars Technica - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 13:15

Enlarge / A multi-walled carbon nanotube. (credit: NASA)

Carbon capture and storage involves the separation of carbon dioxide from other gases, after which it's pumped underground for storage. It's likely to be needed to reach our climate goals without simply shutting down many existing fossil fuel plants, and it will be essential if we overshoot our emissions goals by mid-century. But it also adds significant costs to building and operating fossil fuel plants, which explains why the process has never gotten past the point of sporadic demonstration projects.

An alternative to storage involves turning the carbon that's captured into a useful project—something the XPrize has made one of its challenges. Doing so requires two things: overcoming the chemical stability of CO2 and making a product that sells at a profit. We recently stumbled across a bit of creative chemistry that turns carbon dioxide from the air into a product that should be profitable: high-quality carbon nanotubes.

Something in the air

Our current methods for making carbon nanotubes typically rely on hydrocarbons. The chemistry of this source helps drive the tube-forming reactions, since it can be energetically favorable to remove the hydrogens from these molecules. Unfortunately, this doesn't get rid of CO2, and it's only good for emissions in the sense that some of the carbon ends up in nanotubes instead of the air.

Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Money Pro 1.9.5 - Manage money like a pro.

MacUpdate - Mac OS X - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 13:12


Money Pro is the next generation of Money app (over 2 million downloads worldwide).

Money Pro is the one place for bill planning, budgeting and keeping track of your accounts. Easy sync with iPhone/iPad versions. Money Pro works great for home budgeting and even for business use.

Features
  • Calendar
  • Today view
  • Bills due notifications
  • Budgets
  • Budget rollover
  • Checkbook register
  • Account reconciliation
  • Import of bank statements
  • Split transactions
  • Calculator and currency converter
  • Search
  • Detailed reports
  • Lots of options for customization
  • iCloud
  • Multiple profiles
  • Data export
  • Notification Center widget

Note: This application contains in-app and/or external module purchases.



Version 1.9.5:
  • Privacy update notice


  • OS X 10.10 or later


Download Now]]>

[CAN] [$700] [15.6'] Producer and Gamer looking for most bang for buck

  • Total budget and country of purchase:

$700 MAX. Ontario, Canada.

  • Do you prefer a 2 in 1 form factor, good battery life or best specifications for the money? Pick or include any that apply.

Best specifications for the money is most important to me. Then battery life. Then any added forms.

  • How important is weight and thinness to you?

As long as it can fit into a regular sized computer bag then it should be fine.

  • Which OS do you require? Windows, Mac, Chrome OS, Linux.

Windows 10.

  • Do you have a preferred screen size? If indifferent, put N/A.

I'm used to 15.6", so smaller would be a little weird. Bigger is fine.

  • Are you doing any CAD/video editing/photo editing/gaming? List which programs/games you desire to run.

I game occasionally, but most of my time is spent on FL Studio, Adobe Audition, Premier, After Effects. That kind of stuff.

  • If you're gaming, do you have certain games you want to play? At what settings and FPS do you want?

I'm a big fan of the Battlefield franchise, so anything that could run their latest title would be awesome.

  • Any specific requirements such as good keyboard, reliable build quality, touch-screen, finger-print reader, optical drive or good input devices (keyboard/touchpad)?

I haven't put much thought into any of these. My current a computer, a really low-end one, doesn't have a backlit keyboard which can be kind of annoying when I'm pulling late nights. I guess that'd be my only specification.

  • Leave any finishing thoughts here that you may feel are necessary and beneficial to the discussion.

I took a look at the suggested laptops for gaming on this sub, and the Dell Inspiron 15 5000 5577 seems like a good fit, but I'm completely new to all of this so I thought I'd ask if there were any cheaper, still viable options.

Any responses will be greatly appreciated! Thanks.

submitted by /u/Nicco--
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Google brings AR tours to its Expeditions field trip app

Engadget - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 13:12
Last year, Google announced that it was working on bringing AR to its Expeditions platform and since then, it has been testing AR expeditions with around one million students. Today, the company has made those AR tours available to everyone, adding a...

Which one is easier to learn and is fun ?

Learn Programming - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 13:10

Essentially we are required to create a game for 2nd year. And the teacher has listed bunch of technology we can use

Slick2D, LWJGL, LibGDX, and JavaFX

C# (Unity)

I have been learning java and i am confident with the fundamentals.

Should I pick up C# for unity?

My question is , which game engine is good in terms of funniness, has plenty of resources, and is most in demand in terms of jobs etc

Are there any good resources do you recommend if you recommend a certain technology so i can learn ?

submitted by /u/imran0121
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Trump hits campaign trail to endorse key foe of net neutrality rules

Ars Technica - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 13:02

Enlarge / NASHVILLE, TENN.: President Donald Trump introduces Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.), who is running for US Senate, during a rally at the Nashville Municipal Auditorium on May 29, 2018. (credit: Getty Images | Drew Angerer )

Net neutrality foe Marsha Blackburn's quest for a US Senate seat got a plug yesterday from President Donald Trump, who endorsed Blackburn at a campaign rally where he also criticized his various enemies, including "Crooked Hillary."

"[Blackburn] is a great woman," Trump told a crowd at the Nashville Municipal Auditorium. "We need Marsha in the Senate to continue the amazing progress and work that we've done over the last year and a half. There has never been an administration, and even some of our enemies are begrudgingly admitting this, that has done what we've done in the first year and a half."

Rep. Blackburn (R-Tenn.) is one of the most outspoken opponents of strict net neutrality rules in the House of Representatives and chairs a key subcommittee that oversees telecommunications. She is seeking the Republican nomination for one of Tennessee's Senate seats.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

SyncBird Pro 2.2.3 - $29.99

MacUpdate - Mac OS X - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 13:01

SyncBird Pro is an iPhone file manager that makes iOS sync and iTunes cleaning at a glance. Transfer music, playlists, photos, videos, books--everything--between your iPhone, iPad, iPod, and Mac without using iTunes. SyncBird's exclusive features named PhoneCare and TunesClean are made to reclaim more free space on your iPhone and iTunes. Without extra effort, SyncBird will give you a daily, thorough cleanup so that you'll be always free from the storage boundary.

Better design yields better products, so we challenged ourselves to bring Google Material Design to the new macOS platform. The surface, motion, color, and every element in SyncBird, were chosen to give you an exciting and delightful experience.

Features
  • Flash Sync - Optimized for Flash/SSD storage and with instant Add-to-iPhone feature, SyncBird offers better iOS content management experience.
  • 4K Support - A10 chip and M10 coprocessor give monster performance on 4K video playback. SyncBird puts 4K movies on your iPhone, iPad in one go.
  • Auto-Conversion - Whatever movies you like, SyncBird helps trans-code your videos to .m4v, .mp4, and .mov formats, which suit best on Apple devices.
  • Two-Way Sync - Transfer music, videos, photos and probably all your iOS content, to / from your iPhone and iPod. Free your devices from iTunes limits.
  • Unlimited Import - Add new songs and movies to your iPhone, iPad and iPod from multiple iTunes library on different computers. No iTunes involed.
  • Drag-and-Drop - The most straightforward way to populate your iPhone media library is by dragging-and-dropping. Time to use your iPhone like Finder.

The price listed here is for a Syncbird Pro "Family" license. See all pricing options on the developer's pricing info page for more options.



Version 2.2.3:
  • Support the latest iOS 11.4, iTunes 12.7.4 and macOS 10.13.4


  • OS X 10.8 or later


Download Now

VCF East: The Mail Order App Store

Hack a Day - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 13:01

Today we take the concept of a centralized software repository for granted. Whether it’s apt or the App Store, pretty much every device we use today has a way to pull applications in without the user manually having to search for them on the wilds of the Internet. Not only is this more convenient for the end user, but at least in theory, more secure since you won’t be pulling binaries off of some random website.

But centralized software distribution doesn’t just benefit the user, it can help developers as well. As platforms like Steam have shown, once you lower the bar to the point that all you need to get your software on the marketplace is a good idea, smaller developers get a chance to shine. You don’t need to find a publisher or pay out of pocket to have a bunch of discs pressed, just put your game or program out there and see what happens. Markus “Notch” Persson saw his hobby project Minecraft turn into one of the biggest entertainment franchises in decades, but one has to wonder if it would have ever gotten released commercially if he first had to convince a publisher that somebody would want to play a game about digging holes.

In the days before digital distribution was practical, things were even worse. If you wanted to sell your game or program, it needed to be advertised somewhere, needed to be put on physical media, and it needed to get shipped out to the customer. All this took capital that would easily be beyond many independent developers, to say nothing of single individuals.

But at the recent Vintage Computer Festival East, [Allan Bushman] showed off relics from a little known chapter of early home computing: the Atari Program Exchange (APX). In a wholly unique approach to software distribution at the time, individuals were given a platform by which their software would be advertised and sold to owners of 8-bit machines such as the Atari 400/800 and later XL series computers. In the early days, when the line between computer user and computer programmer was especially blurry, the APX let anyone with the skill turn their ideas into profit.

The Fine Print

Of course, Atari’s goals with the program weren’t completely altruistic. At the time, the Atari badly needed more software. So badly that they were willing to take on the role of publisher themselves to help ease the burden of getting new software out for the platform. Developer Chris Crawford, who’s war simulation Eastern Front (1941) ended up selling over 60,000 copies through APX, recalls the origins of the program:

The guy who cooked up the idea, Dale Yocum, was trying to explain to the management that there are a lot people out there that like to write programs and if we can publish these programs for them, it’s a win-win. He put together a business plan for it and said ‘Look, we only need a little bit of money and this thing can be self-sufficient and it might make some money.’ They grudgingly agreed to let him do it because the Atari platform desperately needed a larger software base, a void not being filled by the other publishers of the day.

Costs of the program were reduced by using very utilitarian packaging for the software, and having the developers themselves write the manuals. All Atari had to do was run off the copies and mail them out. Even the split was heavily in Atari’s favor: the developers only received 10% of the sale price for each unit sold.

So not only did APX help fill a gap in Atari’s software library, it brought in plenty of money for them as well. Consider that Eastern Front (1941) is listed at $29.95 in the APX catalog, which totals to nearly $1.8 million (approximately $4.5 million, today) dollars in sales for that single game alone.

The APX Archive

While [Allan] did bring along an Atari 800XL to demonstrate some of the software distributed via APX, the real draw of his table was a selection of mint condition APX boxes, tapes, manuals, and catalogs. The sparse box art and utilitarian manuals were a stark reminder of the program’s frugality. Some of the manuals had all the frivolity of a high school book report; something which was immediately noticeable at VCF East, where there was no shortage of contemporary software to compare against.

[Allan] has made it his mission to scan the boxes and manuals for all of the APX software he can find, including the APX catalogs themselves, and make the information publicly available on the AtariWiki. So even if you can’t see his impressive collection in person, the data about this fascinating experiment in software distribution won’t be lost to time.

History Repeats

Perhaps the most interesting aspect of this look at APX was hearing about its parallels with modern software marketplaces. Some of the programs released via APX were hyper specialized, such as an application for keeping track of a newspaper route and one that was used to calibrate color TVs. These programs would likely never have seen the light of day, at least commercially, if a marketplace such as APX didn’t exist.

But as APX became more popular, Atari had to start tightening up their standards. In the early days, the bar was fairly low for acceptance into the program, but towards the end more and more software had to get rejected. While there’s no hard numbers on how many programs got the boot, Director of APX Fred Thorlin did admit in an interview that some of the early titles would never have been accepted if they were submitted later on in the program.

So the next time you look at all the low effort copycat games and applications vying for your download on the Google Play store of Apple App Store, just remember: Atari tried to warn us.

Life returned to crater of Cretaceous asteroid in the blink of an eye

Ars Technica - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 13:00

Enlarge / These plankton apparently didn't mind living in a still-warm seafloor crater. (credit: John Maisano/University of Texas )

Usually, new studies of the dino-killing mass extinction at the end of the Cretaceous provide another view into just how bloody awful it was. But if you’re a glass-half-full kind of person, it’s interesting to think about how quickly life recovered—not on timescales relevant to an individual organism, necessarily, but in terms of species and ecosystems.

A research cruise recently drilled a rock core into the Chicxulub Crater where an asteroid fell 66 million years ago. Coring the deeper rock helped show test models of the impossibly jello-like behavior of the bedrock during the impact, but there are also sedimentary rocks on top that were formed some time after the collision.

Researchers who have looked elsewhere have noticed that life recovered more slowly in the Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic than in other ocean basins, taking about 300,000 years. One hypothesis to explain this is that concentrations of toxic metals were high near the impact crater. If that’s true, recovery should be slowest at ground zero. But that’s not what a huge team led by the University of Texas at Austin’s Christopher Lowery found when they examined rocks that might record the first few years after the asteroid hit.

Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Active Pen 2-in-1 for College

  • Do you prefer a 2 in 1 form factor, good battery life or best specifications for the money? Pick or include any that apply. Heavily prefer 2-in-1 for note taking unless there is a better/cheaper alternative.

  • How important is weight and thinness to you? As long as it is light enough to carry around easily.

  • Which OS do you require? Windows, Mac, Chrome OS, Linux. Windows.

  • Do you have a preferred screen size? If indifferent, put N/A. 15.6" or lower is good.

  • Are you doing any CAD/video editing/photo editing/gaming? List which programs/games you desire to run. Light work and possible some light-GPU intensive software for college and such.

  • If you're gaming, do you have certain games you want to play? At what settings and FPS do you want? Not gaming.

  • Any specific requirements such as good keyboard, reliable build quality, touch-screen, finger-print reader, optical drive or good input devices (keyboard/touchpad)? Needs an active pen since this will be used for note taking. Having a diverse selection of ports and not needing a dongle is a plus.

  • Leave any finishing thoughts here that you may feel are necessary and beneficial to the discussion. I am hoping for a laptop around $1300 or less please! I can wait a bit until school starts but the sooner is better.

submitted by /u/KiLiTLi
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I've got 2 options. Please help me decide

I'm looking to buy a new laptop. I am a junior programmer who also enjoys moderate gaming, just for context. I'm stuck between two machines at very similar price points. Please help me decide:

Choice #1

Lenovo Ideapad 520

8th Gen Intel Core i7-8550U up to 4.0GHz

8MB Cache Processor

8x Threads

12GB DDR4 RAM

128GB Ultra-Fast SSD

NVIDIA Geforce MX150 4GB GDDR5

Choice #2

ASUS ROG GL503VD

7th Generation Kabylake Intel Core i7-7700HQ up to 3.8GHz Processor

6MB Cache, 4x Cores

8x Threads

12GB DDR4 RAM

1TB High-Performance Hybrid Hard Drive (FireCuda)

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 4GB GDDR5

Which would get me better performance for my work?

Are either of these and good for gaming if I wanted AAA titles on 1080p medium to high? I'm used to Xbox One gameplay so can either of these match that?

Thanks and God bless. submitted by /u/Ryan_ED
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Google Chrome now supports more password-free sign-ins

Engadget - Wed, 05/30/2018 - 12:51
Google is acting on its promise to banish more passwords. It just released Chrome 67 for the desktop, bringing the Web Authentication standard to what's arguably the most popular browser. As with Firefox, the technology allows password-free sign-in...

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